Jeanet Dreskin and four former students featured in ‘Teacher/ Student’ exhibit

Dreskin spent years teaching at the University of South Carolina, the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities, and the Greenville County Museum’s Art School. It’s the latter endeavor that the Hampton III Gallery is celebrating with their new exhibit, “Teacher/Student.” In the exhibit, works by four of Dreskin’s students, Jim Campbell, Carrie Burns Brown, Jo Carol Mitchell-Rogers, and Alice Schlein, stand alongside her own paintings.

Historian Carolyn Day explores one of the strangest fashion trends in history

While pursuing her postgraduate history degree, Dr. Carolyn A. Day kept finding references to tuberculosis as “an easy and beautiful way to die,” which was not in keeping with her understanding of the disease from a medical perspective. 

Old Crow Medicine Show puts a new spin on Bob Dylan’s ‘Blonde on Blonde’

Old Crow Medicine Show, the Virginia sextet that has been blending bluegrass, acoustic country, folk, and old-time music for almost 20 years, has always had a connection with Bob Dylan in one way or another.

Narcotic Wasteland’s Dallas Toler-Wade returns to earlier metal roots in latest album

When we last spoke with Greenville’s Dallas Toler-Wade, he had just left Nile, a popular Upstate death metal band that has charted albums all over the world.

Greenville’s public art collection is expanding

Tsuzuki’s Butterfly Project has installed hundreds of butterflies on buildings, light posts, and downtown parking garages.

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Old Crow Medicine Show puts a new spin on Bob Dylan’s ‘Blonde on Blonde’

Old Crow Medicine Show, the Virginia sextet that has been blending bluegrass, acoustic country, folk, and old-time music for almost 20 years, has always had a connection with Bob Dylan in one way or another.

Narcotic Wasteland’s Dallas Toler-Wade returns to earlier metal roots in latest album

When we last spoke with Greenville’s Dallas Toler-Wade, he had just left Nile, a popular Upstate death metal band that has charted albums all over the world.

J. Roddy Walston’s arena-ready new LP

Played back to back, the two most recent albums by the Baltimore quartet J. Roddy Walston & The Business don’t even sound like the same band made them.

A Bygone Era: Youth Code channels the dark, abrasive vibe of vintage industrial music

“Dark, foreboding, menacingly mechanical”: Industrial music duo, Youth Code, is helping bring metallic chaos to Greenville’s Radio Room.

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The team behind the fright flick ‘Risers’ turns to the service industry for help

Jeff Martell sees a parallel between creating a successful restaurant and making a movie. “You have to build a crew and do a lot of prep work, and you need a lot of money to do it.”

Pastor’s homeless ministry expands to documentary film

Jeff Akers’ “Homeless in the South” takes an in-depth view into the lives of the homeless and the efforts to help them in Greenville as well as cities in Alabama, Georgia, and North Carolina.

Award-winning film about Syrian refugees coming to Greenville March 26

“Salam Neighbor” follows the lives of Syrian children and others in the Za’atari Refugee Camp in Jordan. “Salam” means “peace” in Arabic and is a common greeting, like saying “Hello.”

And the Winner Is…

All of this year’s Oscar-nominated live action, animation, and documentary shorts will be screened Feb. 17–19 at the Peace Center.

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Furman comedy troupe Idiom Savant reforms … for one night only

When they step onstage at The Velo Fellow next Saturday, the members of comedy/improv troupe Idiom Savant will have not performed in 25 years.

The Greenville Little Theatre receives an extraordinary gift

Allen McCalla, GLT’s executive artistic director, said the gift would benefit the theater for generations to come.

Moody Black and his slam poetry team are hidden gems in Greenville’s arts scene

For a couple of decades, Moody Black, aka Robert Mullins Jr., has been standing on stages around the Upstate and around the country, delivering his words at open mics and poetry slams.

An exploration of gentrification in ‘Clybourne Park’ hits close to home in Greenville

Greenville’s unprecedented growth has sparked debate regarding affordable housing and gentrification, and the Warehouse Theatre is preparing to tackle the latter issue head-on in its production of Bruce Norris’ “Clybourne Park.”

GSO opens season with Beethoven tribute, return of soloist Dmitri Levkovich

GSO’s 70th season is a milestone like that deserves something powerful, passionate, and crowd-pleasing, and only one name comes to mind: Ludwig Von Beethoven.

Based on a graphic memoir, ‘Fun Home’ is a surprising Broadway success

“Fun Home” opens on Sept. 26 at the Peace Center for eight performances.

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Jeanet Dreskin and four former students featured in ‘Teacher/ Student’ exhibit

Dreskin spent years teaching at the University of South Carolina, the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities, and the Greenville County Museum’s Art School. It’s the latter endeavor that the Hampton III Gallery is celebrating with their new exhibit, “Teacher/Student.” In the exhibit, works by four of Dreskin’s students, Jim Campbell, Carrie Burns Brown, Jo Carol Mitchell-Rogers, and Alice Schlein, stand alongside her own paintings.

Greenville’s public art collection is expanding

Tsuzuki’s Butterfly Project has installed hundreds of butterflies on buildings, light posts, and downtown parking garages.

Lake City’s ArtFields competition accepting submissions

Seventeen artists from Greenville were represented in the 2017 festival.

SC Governor’s School alum starring in ABC comedy ‘The Mayor’

Brandon Micheal Hall plays Courtney Rose, a rapper who runs for mayor as a publicity stunt, then has to learn the job on his feet after he wins the election.

New West End Plaza art: And the winner is…

Chances are, this isn’t your favorite.

Greenville City Council approves decommissioning of “The Path of Becoming” and construction of a new sculpture

“The Path of Becoming, ” a piece of public art that had been on Greenville’s Main Street, was a casualty of the ongoing Camperdown development on the site of the now-demolished Greenville News building.

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Historian Carolyn Day explores one of the strangest fashion trends in history

While pursuing her postgraduate history degree, Dr. Carolyn A. Day kept finding references to tuberculosis as “an easy and beautiful way to die,” which was not in keeping with her understanding of the disease from a medical perspective. 

YA author Kwame Alexander finds the poetry in sports

Alexander will present the closing keynote address at Read Up, Greenville, a daylong festival that celebrates middle-grade and young adult books, authors, and readers.

Clemson grad Dan Leach dishes on debut short story collection

The collection has garnered praise from Southern fiction writer George Singleton, who described “Floods and Fires” as “beautifully written” and “soul-shaking.” Other reviewers have favorably compared Leach’s writing to that of Ron Rash and the late Larry Brown.

YA authors examine unexpected loss, self-harm in latest novels

As part of Read Up Greenville’s yearlong program to celebrate young adult and middle-grade literature, two authors will be in conversation on Saturday to discuss their latest novels and answer questions.

Murder, She Wrote (Again)

Journalist turned preacher and homeless advocate Deb Richardson-Moore writes the second book in her mystery series.

‘The Gatekeeper’ sheds new light on the most powerful woman in FDR’s White House

For most, Marguerite “Missy” LeHand isn’t a well-recognized name from American history.

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