The Marie Kondo effect felt in Greenville

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Call it the Marie Kondo effect.

Greenville residents have been going through their overstuffed closets, toy chests, and bookshelves, looking for the items that “spark joy” and getting rid of the rest, and producing a surge of donations to thrift stores and a rush of people to consignment shops.

The wave of tidying all started after Netflix’s Jan. 1 release of the series “Tidying Up With Marie Kondo.”

“It definitely has had an effect,” said Sadie Cherney, owner of Clothes Mentor on Haywood Road, who said she’s had people coming in with trash bags full of clothes they are trying to sell. “It feels like three times what is normal for this time of year.”

Liz Daly-Korbyski said she saw the Netflix show, ended up binge-watching the series, and soon found herself going through her clothes. One recent Saturday night, she was out with friends when her husband told her he and their son were organizing their guest room.

“My husband and son were cleaning without any browbeating,” she said. “I was really surprised how well they took to it.”

Erin Rigot actually got a jump on the newest wave of Greenville tidy-ers. She has been doing the KonMari method of tidying for three years, shortly after the 2014 release of Kondo’s book, “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up.” She and her husband lived in a 1950s starter home that she said was “busting at the seams with stuff.”

“I actually felt the need to move,” she said. “I thought we had outgrown the house.”

Rigot started with her clothes. Since then, she and her husband have tackled all five of Kondo’s categories: clothing, books, papers, komono (miscellaneous items), and mementos. For those who aren’t familiar with the KonMari method, she recommends decluttering and organizing by categories instead of rooms.

“We’re total believers,” she said.

Korbyski said she’s sparked further joy through mindful donation. She’s given clothing to school clothes pantries and just last week donated books to the little library at St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School.

Cherney said if holding each item to see if it sparks joy and thanking items that don’t for their service is not a person’s style, they could ask if they’d spend money on it again.

For those who haven’t gotten the tidying bug, there’s good news. There’s now a bunch of good, new stuff at Greenville’s thrift stores and consignment shops.

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