Sound Bites: Walter Salas-Humara, Malcolm Holcombe, and Bad Internet presents Palace III

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Walter Salas-Humara

Walter Salas-Humara
Horizon Records, 2 W. Stone Ave. Greenville
Friday, Sept. 22, 7 p.m.
Free

As the singer and primary songwriter for The Silos since 1985, Walter Salas-Humara has spent over three decades writing guitar-driven short stories, mixing straight-ahead rock with folkier, more intimate balladry. As the band hung on the periphery of mainstream success through the years, Salas-Humara built a substantial catalog of first-rate songs, and after spending the last few years focusing on a prolific solo career, he’s returned to those Silos classics on the recent “Work: Part One” and “Part Two” albums, albeit with very different arrangements. “The rule I made was no electric or percussion instruments of any kind,” he says. “I wanted to have a record of all my best songs in a style that was kind of unaffected.” The albums also gave Salas-Humara a chance to collaborate with producer, singer, and multi-instrumentalist Richard Brotherton. “I’ve known Rich for so long, and he’s such a great singer and player and producer,” he says. “The nice thing for me is that he’s a very spare player, and he has great instincts. He plays in a way that makes it all about the songs.”


Malcolm Holcombe by Andrea Furlan

Malcolm Holcombe with Stevie Tombstone
The Spinning Jenny, 107 Cannon St., Greer
Saturday, Sept. 23, 8 p.m.
$12 adv/$15 door

Since 1994, Waterville, N.C.’s Malcolm Holcombe has been writing songs about hard luck, hard choices, hard times, and hard love, creating a universe of characters and putting across their stories with a thorny, gritty rasp that drips with emotion. Because Holcombe often plays these songs in stripped-down arrangements centered around his acoustic guitar, he’s been commonly labeled a folk artist, even if other kinds of music are frequently part of his style. “It’s folk-blues, folk-rock, all kinds of stuff,” Holcombe says. “It’s hard to label things. I like to call it folk music just to keep it simple, but it’s a little bit of everything.” Holcombe’s new album “Pretty Little Troubles” has a darker atmosphere than some of his other efforts, and references abound to difficult times, whether the songs are about matters of the heart or people struggling just to get by. “It’s hard for me to ignore the world around me now,” he says. “I don’t drink anymore, so I can’t enjoy a blackout to try to avoid reality.”


Marquise Noir

Bad Internet presents Palace III, featuring Marquise Noir, Maxx Good$, and The Rowdy Ruff Boyz
Artistry Workshops & Gallery, 12 Andrews St., Greenville
Saturday, September 23, 8 p.m.
$20

Promoter, producer, and rapper Brent Best (aka $amson) is unveiling his latest Palace show this weekend. His previous two events –through his management and production collective Bad Internet – were created to put the talent of the Upstate’s visual artists on display. But for the third volume at Artistry, he’s changing things up a bit. “The past two were strictly art installations, with maybe a DJ,” Best says, “but this one’s going to take it to another level. We’re going to have interactive pieces, live musicians, two house DJs, and a full gallery.” As for the reason behind the expansion, he says it’s simply a matter of room. “It’s the biggest venue we’ve been in so far,” he says. “I plan these things based on the space we’re in, and this space allowed for it. I felt like in the last two, the music would have been distracting people from enjoying the art, but here, you can enjoy the art and then go across a threshold to a whole different area with drinks and music. It’ll make for a more complete experience. I wanted it to be equal parts art show, live music, and party.”

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